Heritage Village, East Grand Forks, Minnesota

Fun'd Night - Music, Food and Fun all to raise money for the maintenance of the Heritage Village. 


Come and enjoy Fun’d Nite

March 31, 2017

East Grand Forks VFW

Social 5-6 pm

Dinner 6-7:00 pm

(Roast Beef, Walleye, or Shrimp)

Several Cash Prize Drawings

(Need to be present to win.)

Silent Auction

Paddle Wheel & 50/50

Tickets $25 per person

To purchase tickets call

Tom Barrett 701-739-3030


Raising funds to repair the Nisbet Farmstead log buildings at Heritage Village.

Chinking (packing between the logs), especially the daubing (wet-troweled finish layer), is the least durable part of a log building. It is susceptible to cracking as a result of freeze-thaw action, structural settlement, drying of the logs, and a thermal expansion-contraction rate that differs from that of the logs. Seasonal deterioration of chinking necessitates continual inspection and regular patching or replacement.

A "log cabin" was usually constructed with round rather than hewn, or hand-worked, logs, and it was the first generation homestead erected quickly for frontier shelter. One of the principal advantages of log construction was the economy of tools required to complete a structure. A felling axe was the traditional tool for bringing down the tree and cutting the logs to length. For many frontier and western structures the round logs were debarked or used in their original form with the bark left on, or one or more sides of the logs were hewn flat with a broadaxe, or more finely finished with an adze as smooth thick planks. Notching was done with an axe, hatchet or saw; openings for doors and windows were usually cut after the logs were set into place, and door and window frames, particularly jambs, were put in place during construction to help hold the logs in place. Roof framing members and floor joists were either hewn from logs or of milled lumber. A log cabin could be raised and largely completed with as few as two to four different tools, including a felling axe, a broad axe, and a hand saw or crosscut saw.

Corner notching is another of the characteristic features of log construction. Most notching methods provide structural integrity, by locking the log ends in place. The basic log cabin is a one room enclosure formed by four log walls joined at their corners, called a single "pen" or "crib."

 

The horizontal spaces or joints between logs are usually filled with a combination of materials that together is known as "chinking" and "daubing." Chinking and daubing completed the exterior walls of the log pen by sealing them against driving wind and snow, helping them to shed rain, and blocking the entry of vermin. In addition, chinking and daubing could compensate for a minimal amount of hewing and save time if immediate shelter was needed. Not all types of log buildings were chinked. Corncribs, and sometimes portions of barns where ventilation was needed were not chinked. A variety of materials were used for chinking and daubing, including whatever was most conveniently at hand. Generally though, it is a three-part system applied in several steps. The chinking consists of two parts: first, a dry, bulky, rigid blocking, such as wood slabs or stones is inserted into the joint, followed by a soft packing filler such as oakum, moss, clay, or dried animal dung. Daubing, which completes the system, is the outer wet-troweled finish layer of varying composition, but often consisting of a mixture of clay and lime or other locally available materials. Instead of daubing, carefully fitted quarter poles or narrow wood strips were sometimes nailed lengthwise across the log joint. Chinking, especially the daubing, is the least durable part of a log building. It is susceptible to cracking as a result of freeze-thaw action, structural settlement, drying of the logs, and a thermal expansion-contraction rate that differs from that of the logs. Seasonal deterioration of chinking necessitates continual inspection and regular patching or replacement.

The Preservation and Repair of Historic Log Buildings by Bruce D. Bomberger, National Park Service